All the Languages

Resources on Languages from Afrikaans to Yoruba

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Vocabolario italiano

languageramblings:

lasciare (v) - to leave, let go

consumare (v) - to consume, deplete, wear out

fermare (v) - to secure, fasten

pur (conj) - just to, in order to, even if

giurare (v) to swear, vow

preferire (v) to prefer, favour

addio (excl) - farewell, goodbye

riflesso (nm) - reflection

Filed under italian

98 notes

In a few languages, the way men talk is different from the way women talk. In Japanese, for instance, there are certain words and sentences that only males use, and certain words and sentences that only females use. If you were in a school in Japan, and saw a message on a notice board which read “boku …”, you’d know it would probably have been written by a boy, because that’s the words boys use for “I”. If a girl had written the message it would probably have been “watashi”. I have to say “probably”, of course, because it’s always possible for a girl who’s a bit of a tomboy to say “boku”. But normally, the two forms are used differently by the two sexes.

A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 139.  (via linguaphilioist)

While I’d like to imagine people are reading this and thinking, “hm, interesting,” this is probably more inline with the recent trend of “look what weird backwards shit Japan is doing,” (see the recent ooing over “b-style”), and that’s messed up, because guess what probably most languages do this! (I mean this isn’t even grammatical gender, if you wanna dig in on Russian/Spanish/Hebrew…) Wow language and gender are socialized!

In English there has been much fussing over “women’s speech” starting with Lakoff in 1975, so let me just pull out a few things. In English some words are very gendered; we take note when a man says something like “divine” or “lovely,” and precise color words like fuscia are left to women and “gay fashion designers”(ugh, don’t start me on queer ling). Women are also typically held to politeness standards that increase their use of hedges, polite forms, and apologies; “If you have a moment…,” “I think it’s sort of…” (generalizing, this and most studies are on white, middle class, cis, straight women; and well hey super polite female Japanese is also a generalization) Men are allowed more coarseness/cursing, and we find their version of being “straightforward” is equated with a woman being a “bitch.” So there’s that just incase you were up on your Standard American English high horse. 

And so surprise, the development of some of Japanese female speech also relates to these same social things; some “female endings” really are just particles that soften a statement, and then whup weird indexing of women = speaking softly. So dudes can use them, just like a dude can use hedges, but it is not interpreted the same. The actually different lexicon and other more markedly female things used to be super looked-down on as “school girl speech” when it started in the Meiji period (because of integrated schooling, more social stuff, etc etc.) but then it solidified with time (and in literature) and became the now assumed women’s speech/onna kotoba / 女言葉. (decent tofugu article with more)

So this stuff is super cool (‘cus I’m a nerd!!!) but also complicated and I kind of get grouchy over all the little “cute language facts” books that pop up. Because look wow I just gave you a pretty short and decent summary without the weird exoticizing. Wah wah getting a ling degree so I can complain on tumblr.

(via tongueturner)

(via tongueturner)

Filed under japanese language languages linguistics

58,002 notes

tuejjlaz:

howlsmoving-asshole:

howllor:

oh my godddddd there is a new swedish reality tv show where they are tracking down internet trolls and confronting them about the death threats they’ve sent to people, since it’s actually illegal.

watching them try to explain how it’s not them is the best entertainment i’ve ever seen.

this episode ended with them fining him 5000 SEK to be paid to the victim!

guess what America should do

What is this show called I need it in my life

(via st-chair)

Filed under swedish tv tv3.se/trolljägarna

98 notes

In a few languages, the way men talk is different from the way women talk. In Japanese, for instance, there are certain words and sentences that only males use, and certain words and sentences that only females use. If you were in a school in Japan, and saw a message on a notice board which read “boku …”, you’d know it would probably have been written by a boy, because that’s the words boys use for “I”. If a girl had written the message it would probably have been “watashi”. I have to say “probably”, of course, because it’s always possible for a girl who’s a bit of a tomboy to say “boku”. But normally, the two forms are used differently by the two sexes.
A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 139.  (via linguaphilioist)

(via valerie-an)

Filed under japanese

4,417 notes

LANGUAGE LEARNING MASTERPOST

prototumblinguist:

lestradler:

For all of those who want to learn a language but don’t know where to start, need extra help as you learn it, or if you’re just bored. These are the resources I’ve gathered over the last few months (feel free to add to it!)

General sites with…

Filed under language language learning useful resource resources german spanish french italian japanese chinese korean vietnamese russian mandarin linguistics irish gaelic gallifreyan

52 notes

Whisky

poesiaespanol:

Me gusta pensar en nuestra relación como un buen trago de whisky escocés ,porque quiero beberla así, solita; no me gusta diluirla con terceros. No quiero agregar hielo, porque después de todo ,si me costó tanto trabajo derribarlo para conocerte ¿por qué habría de añadirlo de nuevo? 
Y si en un inicio hace arder dentro de mí, no importa, porque sé que bien llegado el final, siempre me deja ese sabor dulce en la garganta.

Víctor Hugo Chávez 

Guadalajara, Jalisco México

(via languagesarerad)

Filed under spanish